EXPERTS VERSUS LAYMEN:

A Study of the Patsy and the Subcontractor (1976) by Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D. $ 38.00
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We live in a society of laymen who devotedly bow to the wisdom’s and whims of experts by complying with their orders and following their advice. The patsy (layman)-the know-nothing turn to the experts-- the know-it-alls for help, service and work. The patsy has no training and little experience and the experts, have both. The patsy has no time, and usually no inclination to find it, to gain the training and experience necessary for handling their problems. Accordingly, they turn to the experts who make a business and sometimes a profession of putting the requisite time into those kinds of problems and who can assure a timely resolution and a good measure of quality. In turning to the expert, the layman usually gives what the latter claims, that is, almost unconditional compliance with his conditions for the timing, costs, and quality of work which will bring about a satisfactory resolution despite any by-product stresses. The patsy will give, in short, the expert power over their working relationship in anticipation of a successful outcome to his problem. The expert, then, clearly has in his favor the balance of power symmetry over their continuing relation-ship. The expert can direct the work to be done during the period in which he holds his power.  This book presents some theory and practice on the expert-layman relationship, based on one patsy's dealings with approximately 200 subcontractors at various stages of home construction and offers several reasons why the patsy might run the show himself.



CONTENT

Chapter 1
Playing Patsy
Part I
Comparative Bidding
Chapter 2
Inviting Bids
Chapter 3
Detailing the Job
Chapter 4
Choosing a Subcontractor
Part II
Generalling the Job
Chapter 5
Temporal Control of a Job
Chapter 6
Articulating Successive Jobs
Chapter 7
Quality Control of Job
Chapter 8
Closure: Temporal, Quality and Financial Contents
Part III
Concluding Views
Chapter 9
Notes on the Expert-layman Relationship